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Workshops

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For more information on how to book a human rights workshop in your classroom, contact us!

 


 

 

Power and Privilege Workshops

 

Grades 5-8:

One 60-minute workshop, “To have or not to have: do we all have privilege?” will allow students to explore the various ways in which privilege and oppression exist in our society. Students will gain a basic understanding of relevant terms, including expanding their vocabulary and knowledge surrounding the isms (sexism, racism, ableism etc.). Emphasis will be placed on the importance of being an ally and using one’s privilege to challenge discrimination and oppression. This workshop has been developed in conjunction with MARL’s Manitoba Youth Leadership in Social Justice Program, designed to assist students and staff who are attempting to establish a strong social justice community in schools. This workshop would complement the Health Education curriculum’s material designed provide the students with an opportunity to develop a positive self-image with an accurate perception of their own privilege within society.

 

Grades 9-12:

One 60-minute workshop, “To have or not to have: do we all have privilege?” will provide students with a general understanding of terms surrounding privilege, oppression, and various forms of isms: racism, sexism, classism, etc. The intersectionality of oppressions will be briefly explored, providing a fuller explanation of how various forms of discrimination and oppression interact. Students will be encouraged to consider their own privilege and understand what it means to harness it as active allies. This workshop has been developed in conjunction with MARL’s Manitoba Youth Leadership in Social Justice Program, designed to assist students and staff who are attempting to establish a strong social justice community in schools. This workshop provides the opportunity for students to draw connections between their social studies social justice related content and how they themselves walk through life as a responsible member of society.


 

 

Under 18 Handbook Workshop

 

Grades 7-12:

One 60-minute workshop, The Under 18 Handbook Workshop is designed to engage youth in how the law influences their lives and supports their rights specifically as youth. The workshop works as a compliment to the Under 18 Handbook to build a better understanding of what laws are and how they work, differentiating between rights and privileges, interacting with the police and discovering the Youth Criminal Justice Act. Taking Action in Social Justice Workshop

 

Grades 7-12:

Activism can seem overwhelming and joining a cause can seem intimidating but did you know that even small actions can be a step towards social justice? Anyone can participate in activism. In this workshop, students examine their own identities and experiences, look at empowerment, steps of social activism, different activists, where to start when looking for allies, and activities to help students find their own voices. Students will create their own social justice campaigns on a topic of their choice. The suggested length for this workshop is three hours. Note: It is not necessary for students to participate in the power and privilege workshop before the taking action workshop but it is suggested.

 


 

 

Colonialism and Canada & TRC Workshops

 

Grades 5-8:

A series of two 60 minute workshops exploring the impact of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission for all Canadians. Workshops could be presented individually as one workshop session.

The first workshop “The Importance of Truth” focuses on how assimilation and colonization have influenced Indigenous peoples in Canada. Through references to the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, students will gain an understanding of how human rights were violated through the use of residential schools. Students will also explore the importance of listening to the stories of residential school survivors in order to understand the truth of Canada’s colonial past.

The second workshop, “Healing through Reconciliation” focuses on how understanding different types of stories can aid in the process of reconciliation. Students will consider what the TRC has done to facilitate reconciliation while also brainstorming ideas for what can be done individually to work towards reconciliation. The focus of this workshop will be on gaining an understanding of the stories of others, and the importance of healing and reconciliation for creating a healthy Canada.

Through a discussion of the original Indigenous inhabitants of the land and the impact of colonization on these communities, these workshops will draw significant connections with grades five and six Social Studies material focusing on Canadian history.

Grades seven and eight students will be challenged in the workshops to consider the importance of listening to the stories of different communities, lending itself well to the respective social studies curriculums studying diverse societies in our world, both historically and today.

 

Grades 9-12:

A series of three 60 minute workshops titled “Does Everyone Have Human Rights in Canada?” that allows for a critical exploration of colonialism, human rights, and the strength of Indigenous peoples in Canada. If desired, workshops could be presented individually (with advance notice).

The first workshop “Colonialism and Indigenous Peoples” provides an overview of the impact of colonialism globally, paying special attention to Indigenous peoples in Canada. Students will gain an understanding of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and what this means in terms of protecting the unique rights of Indigenous peoples in Canada.

The second workshop, “Colonialism Today” will analyze the Indian Act and the justice system, and how many human rights in Canada are not guaranteed for all Indigenous peoples still today. As well, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission will be explored as a method of healing past human rights violations with a hope for the future.

The third workshop “Colonialism and Resistance” takes a look at the resistance of Indigenous peoples to colonialism currently, and how social movements have sprung up out of a reclamation of Indigenous culture and identity. Students will have the opportunity to explore the realities behind common stereotypes and misunderstandings of Indigenous peoples and discuss the reasons for and forms of resistance that are occurring in Canada today. The workshop concludes with an introduction to the idea of decolonization, leaving students with the opportunity to consider how this relates to their own story.

Through a critical look at the impact of colonization on Indigenous communities today and the attempts to challenge and change this, students in grades nine and ten will be able to draw connections to their social studies material surrounding diversity, democracy, natural resources, and social injustices in Canada.

This workshop will perfectly complement the grade eleven history curriculum, as it will involve a comprehensive discussion of the manifestation of colonization in policy and action in Canada’s history.

Grade twelve students will easily connect workshop material with classroom content surrounding human rights, social justice, wealth, power and the environment. Additionally, the current realities of Indigenous peoples in Canada will be discussed, drawing strong parallels with the social studies discussion of current topics for First Nations, Metis, and Inuit communities.

 


 

 

Sex + Gender Workshops

 

Grades 5-8:

One 60-minute workshop, “Pink, Blue and Everything in Between” will explore the various spectrums that contribute to our identity formation (gender identity, gender expression, sexual orientation, and biological sex), while discussing how socially constructed ideals can influence these identities. Students will draw the connection between LGBTTQ* rights and human rights through an exploration of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Basic definitions of common LGBTTQ* terms will be discussed, as well as ways in which discrimination exists and can be confronted by students.

This workshop will provide a comprehensive addition to the Health Education curriculum surrounding building a healthy self-concept with a focus on one’s gender and sexual identity. Additionally, this workshop draws connections with the material in Health Education on personal and social management and exploring the importance of healthy and positive relationships with all people.

 

Grades 9-12:

One 60-minute workshop, “Breaking the Binary” will explore the various spectrums that contribute to our identity formation (gender identity, gender expression, sexual orientation, and biological sex), while discussing how socially constructed ideals have an influence on these identities. General definitions of common LGBTTQ* terms will be discussed as well as LGBTTQ* legal rights in the Canadian context. In addition, focus will be given to the unique experiences of transgender individuals in North America. By exploring homophobia and discrimination, students will gain a better understanding of ways in which they can confront these forces.

This workshop will effectively enhance the Health Education curriculum surrounding human sexuality and relationships. Exploring a positive self-concept surrounding one’s gender and sexual identity will be emphasized, as well as the importance of respecting this process for one’s peers. In addition, this workshop draws connections with the social studies curriculum analysis of legal and human rights being extended to certain demographics.